neuroscience

Isolated crayfish are more resistant to the effects of alcohol

For crayfish at least, a more sociable life makes booze work quicker. When crayfish were put in water containing a little alcohol, the ones who had been kept on their own over the preceding week took longer to show signs of alcohol exposure – such as tail flips – than those who had been living with others of their kind. Read more in New Scientist.

Dietary fibre acts on brain to suppress appetite

Mouse study suggests that brain activity, not gut hormones, accounts for fibre’s weight-control action.

People have long been told that a diet high in fibre can help to fight obesity, but how it does so has been unclear. A study of mouse metabolism now suggests that a product of fibre fermentation may be directly affecting the hypothalamus, a region of the brain involved in regulating appetite. Read more in Nature.