mining

Trapping seawater contaminants in calcareous deposits

Electrochemical technique can trap up to 24% of nickel in metal-rich seawater, in just seven days.

The same process that causes crusty limescale to build up on the inside of your kettle could help to clean up nickel pollution in seawater, according to new research from the South Pacific island of New Caledonia. Read more in Chemistry World.

Extreme prospects

High gold prices are making it worthwhile to look for gold in some unusual places.

Demand has never been higher, but nearly all the easy gold has already been mined. So, to maintain production, mining companies are turning to more difficult sources that would have been left in the ground if gold prices had been lower. From the depths of TauTona in the South African veldt, all the way up to Pierina in the Peruvian Andes, 4,100 metres above sea level, miners are digging deeper than ever before, going to more remote locations and politically volatile regions. Read more in Nature.