health

How Are We Now? Inuit Health Survey Returns to Nunavik

A health survey of Inuit communities in northern Quebec found widespread food insecurity and other problems 13 years ago. A follow-up now underway will see how much things have changed.

THE CCGS AMUNDSEN, Canada’s Arctic research icebreaker, has begun a unique portion of its summer research schedule – visiting 14 remote Inuit communities along the shore of Hudson Bay and the Hudson Strait in northern Quebec as part of a large-scale survey of the population’s health and well-being. Read more in Arctic Deeply.

The changing colour of fat

The different functions of white, brown and beige fat might yield new targets in the fight against obesity and metabolic disease.

When you think of fat in the human body, you might picture a homogenous, white substance, much like a block of lard. But researchers are learning that the role of fat in metabolism changes depending on where it is in the body, and even on the type of fat cell. Soon these differences could be harnessed to fight metabolic disorders such as diabetes and obesity. Read more in Nature.

‘Safe’ levels of sugar harmful to mice

Diet comparable to that of many Americans left animals struggling to reproduce and to compete for territory.

Too much sugar is bad for you, but how much, exactly, is too much? A study in mice has found that the animals’ health and ability to compete can be harmed by a diet that has sugar levels equivalent to what many people in the United States currently consume. Read more in Nature.