clinical practice

Evolution in models of primary care

British Columbia has jettisoned its ambitious 2013 election promise to match everyone in the province with a family doctor. It’s yet another sign that governments are beginning to recognise an evolution in the provision of primary medical care — an evolution that’s supported by the College of Family Physicians of Canada.

The GP for Me program had aimed to match every BC resident with a family physician (FP) by the end of 2015. That didn’t happen, despite the fact that BC has 125 FPs per 100 000 population — higher than the national average of 114. Instead of individual FPs, BC will match people with a primary care team that includes doctors as well as nurse practitioners, mental health counsellors, physiotherapists and others. Read more in CMAJ.

Online tools improve mental health in primary care

Mental health issues make up a big part of the workload for primary care physicians. In Ontario, about 20% of patient visits to primary care practitioners are related to mental health, and in many more visits, mental health issues underlie physical symptoms.

But most frontline health care workers often don’t get much training in mental health, says Dr. Peter Selby, director of medical education at the Centre for Addiction and Mental Health (CAMH) in Toronto. “We know that most people with mental health problems are seen in primary care. How do we make sure that doctors have access to this information that may have been missed during med school?” Read more in CMAJ.