Canadian Medical Association Journal

CMA adopts patient focus

The Canadian Medical Association’s new three-year strategy, CMA 2020, aims to make the organization more outward-facing and patient-focused.

The changes came after a period of soul-searching on what the purpose of the CMA was, and how it could best serve its members and the public, said Dr. Brian Brodie, chairman of the board of directors. “We recognize that there are a lot of associations doctors belong to, and why would they pay to belong to different ones that do the same thing?” he said. “So it was important to look for opportunities for us to do something different.” Read more in CMAJ.

Drugs are going missing, but why?

Dr. Jacalyn Duffin, a hematologist and medical historian at Queen’s University in Kingston, first became aware that certain drugs were sometimes getting hard to find in 2010, when her patient at a cancer clinic wanted to stop chemotherapy because she couldn’t get prochlorperazine, a common anti-nausea drug.

Duffin was shocked. “I just couldn’t believe that it was gone. It is a very old, reliable drug that has been around for a long time and it was the only one that worked for her.”

Duffin started investigating and quickly discovered the problem went far beyond an old anti-nausea drug. Read more in CMAJ.

Evolution in models of primary care

British Columbia has jettisoned its ambitious 2013 election promise to match everyone in the province with a family doctor. It’s yet another sign that governments are beginning to recognise an evolution in the provision of primary medical care — an evolution that’s supported by the College of Family Physicians of Canada.

The GP for Me program had aimed to match every BC resident with a family physician (FP) by the end of 2015. That didn’t happen, despite the fact that BC has 125 FPs per 100 000 population — higher than the national average of 114. Instead of individual FPs, BC will match people with a primary care team that includes doctors as well as nurse practitioners, mental health counsellors, physiotherapists and others. Read more in CMAJ.

CMAJ gets interim editor amid governance shake-up

Dr. Diane Kelsall, a long-time CMAJ deputy editor and editor of CMAJ Open, has been appointed interim editor of the CMAJ as part of the journal owner’s restructuring and modernization plan.

On Feb. 29, the Canadian Medical Association (CMA) board of directors dismissed the journal’s editor-in-chief, Dr. John Fletcher, who had held the post for four years, and disbanded the Journal Oversight Committee, which was tasked with mediating between the journal and CMA on matters of editorial independence. Read more in CMAJ.

Online tools improve mental health in primary care

Mental health issues make up a big part of the workload for primary care physicians. In Ontario, about 20% of patient visits to primary care practitioners are related to mental health, and in many more visits, mental health issues underlie physical symptoms.

But most frontline health care workers often don’t get much training in mental health, says Dr. Peter Selby, director of medical education at the Centre for Addiction and Mental Health (CAMH) in Toronto. “We know that most people with mental health problems are seen in primary care. How do we make sure that doctors have access to this information that may have been missed during med school?” Read more in CMAJ.

Calls for more independence for government medical officers

Physicians are calling for Canada’s chief medical officers of health to be given greater independence from provincial governments following the recent firing of New Brunswick’s medical officer, Dr. Eilish Cleary, for reasons that remain unknown.

“The position is too important to allow people to be arbitrarily dismissed,” says Dr. James Talbot, the former chief medical officer of health for Alberta. “We need to be sure they can speak out.” Read more in CMAJ.

Survey aims to capture patient experience

Patients who have spent time in hospital in Canada will soon be asked to rate their experience as part of an effort by the Canadian Institute of Health Information (CIHI) to document and improve patient care across Canada.

“CIHI has been really focused on health system performance reporting, and the kinds of things you need to measure in order to understand [it],” says Kira Leeb, CIHI’s director of health system performance. “Part of that is understanding the patient experience.” Read more in CMAJ.

 

Ebola needed better coordinated Canadian response

IMG_7104Canada needs to step up its game when responding to international disease outbreaks, says New Brunswick’s Chief Medical Officer of Health, who spent more than six months in Africa with the World Health Organization during the Ebola outbreak. Dr. Eilish Cleary was disappointed that the Public Health Agency of Canada was not able to deploy teams of public health experts to help with the response.

“When I was there, especially in the beginning, there were a lot of people from other countries — Americans, a lot of Euro­peans particularly, but there were not that many Canadians. Some Canadian doctors had gone independently, but there was no organized group,” she says. “I think the value for money is better if you send teams.” Read more in CMAJ.

Patient safety a matter of design

An international group of health care systems has begun a year-long project to gather and share data on how to design systems to improve patient safety.

Leading Health Systems Network (LHSN), a partnership between Qatar’s World Innovation Summit for Health (WISH) and Imperial College London, launched the Safer Care Accelerator in March to share best practices and expedite improvement in patient safety. The network is a group of 16 health systems from around the world, including Vancouver Coastal Health and Quebec’s Institut national d’excellence en santé et en services sociaux (INESSS), that share data and benchmark their performance against one another. Read more in CMAJ.

Qatar is a research bonanza for foreigners

Qatar’s heavy investment in medical research is attracting Canadians.

For Kim Critchley, dean of the University of Calgary’s Qatar campus, the biggest advantage to doing research in the tiny Arabian Gulf country is clear: the availability of research funding.

“You have this large funding pool, and less competition to access funds,” she says. “Your chance of being funded is much higher than it is in Canada.” Read more in CMAJ.